Cover of: Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound | Committee to Review Results of ATOC

Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound

Progress Since 1994
  • 160 Pages
  • 3.34 MB
  • 5593 Downloads
  • English
by
National Academies Press
Marine & freshwater mammals, Acoustics & Sound, Fish, General, Mammals, Science / Life Sciences / General, Animals, Science/Mathem
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10358204M
ISBN 10030906886X
ISBN 139780309068864

Low Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals Paperback – Aug by National Research Council (Creator) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Reviews: 1. This volume reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of low-frequency sound on marine mammals and makes recommendations for research.

In addition, the book describes current federal regulations prescribed under the Marine Mammal Protection Act that govern the taking of marine mammals by scientific research activities, and it Reviews: 1. This volume reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of low-frequency sound on marine mammals and makes recommendations for research.

In addition, the book describes current federal regulations prescribed under the Marine Mammal Protection Act that govern the taking of marine mammals by scientific research activities, and it recommends changes to expedite the regulatory. Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound - NCBI Bookshelf.

Sound has become a major tool for studying the ocean. Although the ocean is relatively opaque to light, it is relatively transparent to sound.

Sound having frequencies below 1, Hertz (Hz) is often defined as low-frequency sound. The speed of sound is proportional to the temperature of the water through which it passes.

For its update of research priorities related to marine mammals and low-frequency sound, the Committee augmented the MMRP results with results from the scientific literature, ONR's program on marine mammals, and observations of the reactions of marine mammals to tests of the Navy's low-frequency active sonar.

This report does not examine the effects of all human-generated sound (only low-frequency sound. Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound is an updated review of the National Research Council report Low-Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals: Current Knowledge and Research Needs, based on data obtained from the MMRP and results of any other relevant research, including ONR's research program in low-frequency sound and marine mammals.

This report compares new data Pages:   Format: Paperback This is and excellent book for the researcher, graduate student, or undergrad (with some physics under his or her belt), who wants to learn about the effects of underwater noise on marine mammals.

Currently this topic is the focus of much interest and is one of the most active areas Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound book marine mammology s: 5. This book discusses, among many other topics, just how well marine mammals hear, how noisy the oceans have become, and what effects these new sounds have on marine mammals.

The baseline of ambient noise, the sounds produced by machines and mammals, the sensitivity of marine mammal hearing, and the reactions of marine mammals are also examined. This procedure could, for example, make an incidental take authorization possible in the case of an acoustical oceanography project that would ensonify an area large enough that more than a "small" number of marine mammals might be exposed to significant noise, provided that it could be demonstrated that the effect of the sound on these animals.

Ensonified Species Other than Marine Mammals, 39 Significance of the MMRP to Research Uses of Sound, 39 3. ASSESSMENT OF CONTINUING RESEARCH NEEDS 41 Behavior of Marine Mammals in the Wild, 43 Structure and Function of Marine Mammal Auditory Systems, 49 Effects of Low-Frequency Sounds on the Food Chain, Get this from a library.

Low-frequency sound and marine mammals: current knowledge and research needs. [National Research Council (U.S.).

Description Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound FB2

Committee on Low-Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals,;] -- This volume reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of low-frequency sound on marine mammals and makes recommendations for research.

Get this from a library. Marine mammals and low-frequency sound: progress since [National Research Council (U.S.).

Committee to Review Results of ATOC's Marine Mammal Research Program.;] -- Sound has become a major tool for studying the ocean. Although the ocean is relatively opaque to light, it is relatively transparent to sound. Sound having frequencies below 1, Hertz (Hz) is often. We also plan on convening two working groups inone to explore impacts of noise on low-frequency cetacean (baleen whale) hearing and the second to explore exposure duration for all marine mammal species.

We will continue to coordinate with Federal Agencies to advance our understanding of the impacts of sound on marine mammals.

INTRODUCTION 17 tional information about the effects of low-frequency sound on marine mammals is contained in Chapters 2 and 3.

Low-frequency sounds are used by other marine vertebrates, including sharks and bony fish (Myrberg, ,~. The National Research Council published Marine Mammals and Low Frequency Sound: Progress Since 18 03// Mass stranding of multiple whale species in the Northeast and Northwest Province Channels of the Bahamas coincident with tactical mid-frequency active sonar training exercises by the U.S.

Navy. Mortalities included five Cuvier's. In particular, the issue of whether and how low-frequency sound might affect marine mammals has escalated to national attention because of a proposal to repeatedly measure the speed of sound in the ocean over time to determine if the ocean and the global atmosphere are warming.

Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound is an updated review of the National Research Council report Low-Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals: Current Knowledge and Research Needs, based on data obtained from the MMRP and results of any other relevant research, including ONR's research program in low-frequency sound and marine mammals.

This. An audio collection of sounds made by marine mammals, fish, and technology. Introduction Spectrograms—shown on the right of each image below—are a way to visualize sound, and represent frequency (Y-axis) over time (X-axis). Colleagues and scientists of the Northeast's Passive Acoustic Research Group collected the sounds on this page.

Similar to sonar systems on ships, some whales use sound to detect, localize, and characterize emitting clicks, or short pulses of sound, these marine mammals can listen for echoes and detect objects is called whales and dolphins use echolocation to locate food.

They send out pulsed sounds that are reflected back when they strike a target. Marine mammal ecology. Marine mammals represent a variety of ecological roles, including herbivores (manatees), filter feeders (baleen whales), and top predators (killer whales).Mammals evolved on land around million years ago.

Each taxonomic marine mammal group evolved from a different group of land mammals, whose ancestors separately ventured back into the ocean environment. The Committee discussed a wide range of topics related to its charge.

This chapter presents the results of the Committee's review of the Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP), identification of important future research and observations, specification of desirable regulatory reforms, and ideas for comprehensive monitoring and regulation of sound in the ocean. Marine animals use underwater sound in many important ways.

Just as people talk to each other, marine animals use sound to communicate. However, also like people, vocal marine species hear much more than the sounds they use to communicate with one another.

Download Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound PDF

Marine species use their hearing to find food and mates, avoid predators, and navigate. The NRC (, pp. 53–53) specifically pointed out that a major concern for all low-frequency ensonification is not only effects on marine mammals but also the potential effects of such sounds on other components of marine mammal food chains, such as fish or zooplankton, and on other endangered species (e.g., turtles).

The Committee strongly supports this assertion and continues to. Marine Mammals: Evolutionary Biology, Third Edition is a succinct, yet comprehensive text devoted to the systematics, evolution, morphology, ecology, physiology, and behavior of marine mammals. Earlier editions of this valuable work are considered required reading for all marine biologists concerned with marine mammals, and this text continues that tradition of excellence with updated.

1.

Details Marine Mammals and Low-Frequency Sound PDF

Introduction. Sound plays an important role in the lives of marine mammals. All marine mammal species produce sound, and sound production has been associated with a variety of behaviours including those related to mating, rearing of young.

The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) allows for specified persons to employ measures to deter marine mammals from damaging fishing gear and catch, damaging personal or public property, or endangering personal safety, as long as these measures do not result in death or serious injury of marine.

Marine mammals and many fish rely on sound for navigating, socializing, establishing dominance, attracting mates, avoiding predators, and finding food.

Human-caused ocean noise interferes with their ability to complete these tasks. Depending on the sound source, duration, and location, human-caused sound has the potential to affect animals by. Book I: Importance of Sound in the Sea. A digital book available on the iBooks Store.

Published in April Discovery of Sound in the Sea Book I: Importance of Sound in the Sea focuses on sound in the ocean, both natural and human produced.

Despite the marine focus, much of the information about these sounds and the related underwater bioacoustic principles are true for all aquatic. How do marine mammals use sound to navigate. Sound plays an important role in marine mammal navigation. It may be critical when other senses are of limited use.

Echolocation by odontocetes (toothed whales) has been extensively investigated. They produce a rapid series of clicks and the return echoes provide important information about objects in their. Sound travels exceptionally well in the ocean (much better than light!), and marine mammals have evolved to use sound to interact with their environment.

They may echolocate to find food, sing songs to find mates, or listen carefully to avoid predators such as killer whales. What sounds can animals hear? Most animals, including marine mammals and fishes, hear best at the frequencies they produce and have varying sensitivity to sounds of different frequencies.

Many species differ in their ability to hear at any one frequency. Scientists and audiologists often display hearing abilities as a curve or audiogram, a graph of intensity vs.

frequency. In dry air, sound travels approximately 1 m per 3 milliseconds. Perception of Sound. Sounds are usually perceived through the ears, but some loud or low frequency sounds can be sensed by contact with other parts of the body. Animals use sounds to communicate, for music and also to acquire spatial information about their environment.As a result of this test a "Committee on Low-Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals" was organized by the National Research Council.

Their findings were published inin Low-Frequency Sound and Marine Mammals: Current Knowledge and Research Needs. Long .